For 1,666 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Frank Scheck's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 51
Highest review score: 100 Uncertain
Lowest review score: 0 Contract to Kill
Score distribution:
1666 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    A thoroughly mediocre retelling that feels like an unnecessary footnote.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Rapace gives the film her all, delivering an intense, physically demanding performance, but Close doesn't get close enough to transcending its action-movie clichés.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Frank Scheck
    This talky, ham-fisted effort proves particularly disappointing because it should have been much better than it is.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Frank Scheck
    Virtually nothing of real interest happens in the first half, with the excitement only kicking in around the 45-minute mark. Fortunately, what follows is scary and involving enough to make the lengthy build-up seem worth the wait.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 40 Frank Scheck
    Replicas manages to be perversely entertaining for its fast-paced first half, if only because of the sheer absurdity of its storyline. But it eventually devolves into tedious thriller tropes.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Frank Scheck
    Simmering and subdued, this '90s-set teen drama with supernatural elements features an intriguing premise but doesn't quite seem to know what to do with it. Such restraint is admirable in a genre not known for it, but it results in the film feeling more tepid than it should have been.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Frank Scheck
    Well intentioned in the extreme, Sgt. Will Gardner is more effective as PSA than drama.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Frank Scheck
    Writer-director Bilandic fails to infuse the painfully thin proceedings with any narrative momentum or comic flair, resulting in an oppressive weirdness for weirdness' sake.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Frank Scheck
    The film pretty much packs every canine cliché imaginable into its running time, but one look into the soulful eyes of its four-legged star will melt all but the coldest of hearts.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Frank Scheck
    The screenplay boasts a psychological complexity rare for thrillers of this type, manifested most strikingly in the form of Bernard, who is far from a cardboard cutout villain.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Frank Scheck
    Director Fei Xing stages the violent mayhem in exuberantly giddy fashion, although it all has the feeling of a group of randomly assembled film clips rather than a coherent narrative.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Frank Scheck
    Boasting excellent performances by screen veterans Peter Mullan and Gerard Butler, the latter delivering one of his best turns in years, The Vanishing feels familiar in most ways, including its title (the same as George Sluizer's classic Dutch thriller and its mediocre American remake). Nonetheless, the film proves highly effective with its slowly ratcheted up tension and eerie atmospherics.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Frank Scheck
    Being Rose suffers from its plot contrivances and cliched characters, but it means well and that counts for a lot. It's hard not to get caught up in Rose's fate, especially with Shepherd infusing her portrayal of the spunky character with subtle grace notes. Brolin is equally good, movingly conveying the loneliness and pathos underlying Max's good humor.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 10 Frank Scheck
    Making their previous vehicles Step Brothers and Talladega Nights seem the height of comic sophistication by comparison, Holmes & Watson features the duo parodying Arthur Conan Doyle's famous characters to devastatingly unfunny effect.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Although the procession of talking heads inevitably gives the film a static quality, the visual tedium is alleviated by the filmmaker's handsome cinematography and the picturesque locations in which many of the interviews were shot.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Frank Scheck
    Presenting an evocative portrait of a now-bygone era in the city's past, The Last Resort delivers plenty of nostalgia as is spotlights the work of two photographers who captured the period with vivid immediacy.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 Frank Scheck
    Veering heavily into sexual territory, the film is more a gothic melodrama than a horror film. It certainly feels like a waste of not only Cage's talent (although the actor has a climactic, literally fiery scene that will forever change the way you think about the pop song "Leader of the Pack"), but also Potente, whose potential has been sadly underrealized in American films.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Frank Scheck
    The Quake offers visceral thrills.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 Frank Scheck
    Such an utterly routine, formulaic and forgettable example of its genre that watching it becomes an exercise in endurance. Even the always welcome presence of veteran actor William Fichtner, terrific as usual, isn't enough to save it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Frank Scheck
    Hospitality is the sort of film that looks like a thriller, feels like a thriller and essentially plays out like a thriller. The only thing it forgets to do is provide any actual thrills.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Nothing in the proceedings rings remotely true unless you've been weaned on a steady diet of soulful hit men movies. But the film works to some degree anyway thanks to the terrific performance by Perlman, who infuses the title character with a compelling, world-weary gravitas.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Frank Scheck
    DriverX, which has the style but not the substance of a strong '70s indie drama, stalls out quickly and goes nowhere interesting.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Frank Scheck
    Aiming for charm but instead coming across as hopelessly forced, Swimming With Men barely manages to stay afloat.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    While Back Roads doesn't live up to its considerable dramatic and thematic ambitions, it provides a strong opportunity for its filmmaker/star to stretch his dramatic muscles in the lead role.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Frank Scheck
    Doesn't bring anything new to its very tired genre.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Frank Scheck
    Strictly for the most obsessive fans of the series, The Gilligan Manifesto mainly demonstrates the pitfalls of intellectuals having too much time on their hands.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Frank Scheck
    The chief saving grace of Elliot: The Littlest Reindeer is its auspicious voice cast including Josh Hutcherson, Samantha Bee, John Cleese and Martin Short, among others.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Frank Scheck
    Attempting to be a cautionary tale for the Airbnb era, the pic squanders its potential with ham-fisted execution.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Frank Scheck
    Family in Transition stands out both for the particularities inherent in its setting and the deeply sympathetic individuals at its center.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Frank Scheck
    Although Postcards From London ultimately doesn't quite live up to its considerable ambitions, it offers plenty of arresting moments along the way.

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