Ghost Forests Image
Metascore
78

Generally favorable reviews - based on 7 Critics What's this?

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  • Artist(s): Mary Lattimore
  • Summary: The debut full-length release for the collaboration between Meg Baird and Mary Lattimore was recorded in Los Angeles with Thom Monaghan.
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 7
  2. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. The Wire
    Nov 15, 2018
    80
    While Lattimore is willing to put her instrument through some effects, she never subdues its essential character. Its inherent lightness gives records that bear her name a yielding quality that contrasts with the stark clarity of Baird’s solo work, let alone the body blows delivered by her combo Heron Oblivion. [Dec 2018, p.44]
  2. Nov 13, 2018
    80
    Ghost Forests offers listeners an expansive offering of the duo's strengths in improvisation, songwriting, and interpretation. Yet, for its considerable imagination and creativity, there is also an elegant restraint that allows listeners access to an interior world of sound and poetry perhaps previously unimagined.
  3. Nov 13, 2018
    80
    The mix of instruments is fascinating, but the reason this music lingers is that it is just so beautiful. If you’ve enjoyed either artist in the past, prepare to love everything you loved before and add a little extra.
  4. Uncut
    Nov 13, 2018
    80
    Ghost Forests is a sensual record where the spaces in between the sounds assume a corporeality all their own. [Dec 2018, p.26]
  5. Nov 26, 2018
    74
    This is ambient folk, shot through with ambient anxiety.
  6. Nov 13, 2018
    70
    It’s a perfectly-balanced 36 minutes, and hopefully a foreshadow of more collaborations to come.
  7. Mojo
    Nov 13, 2018
    60
    By the closing traditional, Fair Annie (Child Ballad 62), much of the atmospheric murk has lifted, revealing a radiant kinship with the like of Trees, similarly uncanny folk-rock alchemists from the cusp of the 1970s. [Dec 2018, p.88]